Contents

                     REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. 1 OF 1965
               EFF. MAY 25, 1965, 30 F.R. 7035, 79 STAT. 1317
    Prepared by the President and transmitted to the Senate and the
      House of Representatives in Congress assembled, March 25, 1965,
      pursuant to the provisions of the Reorganization Act of 1949, 63
      Stat. 203, as amended (see 5 U.S.C. 901 et seq.).
                             BUREAU OF CUSTOMS
                      SECTION 1. ABOLITION OF OFFICES
      All offices in the Bureau of Customs of the Department of the
    Treasury of collector of customs, comptroller of customs, surveyor
    of customs, and appraiser of merchandise to which appointments are
    required to be made by the President, by and with the advice and
    consent of the Senate, are abolished.  The foregoing provisions
    shall become effective with respect to each office abolished
    thereby at such time, not later than December 31, 1966, as the
    Secretary of the Treasury shall specify, but nothing herein shall
    empower the Secretary to increase the term of any office beyond
    that provided by law for such office or affect his authority under
    the first paragraph under the heading ''TREASURY DEPARTMENT''
    appearing in the Act of March 2, 1895 (ch. 187, 28 Stat. 844; 5
    U.S.C. 252) (31 U.S.C. 309), to retain in office, prior to December
    31, 1966, those persons whose offices are to be terminated under
    this reorganization plan.
                       SEC. 2. TRANSFER OF FUNCTIONS
      There are transferred to the Secretary of the Treasury the
    functions, if any, that have been vested by statute in officers,
    agencies, or employees of the Bureau of Customs of the Department
    of the Treasury since the effective date of Reorganization Plan No.
    26 of 1950 (64 Stat. 1280).
                      SEC. 3. PRESERVATION OF REMEDIES
      The abolition of offices herein shall not prejudice any right to
    protest or to appeal to the United States Customs Court any action
    taken in the administration of the customs laws.
                       SEC. 4. INCIDENTAL PROVISIONS
      Consonant with section 4 of the Reorganization Act of 1949, as
    amended (see 5 U.S.C. 904) and this reorganization plan, the
    Secretary of the Treasury shall make such provisions as he shall
    deem necessary respecting (1) the transfer or other disposition of
    the records, property, personnel, and unexpended balances of
    appropriations, allocations, and other funds, available or to be
    made available, which are affected by a reorganization contained in
    this reorganization plan; and (2) the winding up of the affairs of
    any officer whose office is abolished by the provisions of this
    reorganization plan.
                          MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT
    To the Congress of the United States:
      All that we do to serve the people of this land must be done, as
    has been my insistent pledge, with the least cost and the most
    effectiveness.
      In my state of the Union message, I announced it was this
    administration's intention to ''reshape and reorganize'' the
    executive branch.  This goal had one objective: ''to meet more
    effectively the tasks of today.''
      I report today now one step taken forward toward that goal as
    part of our progress ''on new economies we were planning to make.''
      I submit today a plan for reorganization in the Bureau of Customs
    of the Department of the Treasury.
      At present the Bureau maintains 113 independent field offices,
    each reporting directly to Customs headquarters in Washington, D.C.
    Under a modernization program of which this reorganization plan is
    an integral part, the Secretary of the Treasury proposes to
    establish six regional offices to supervise all Customs field
    activities.  The tightened management controls achieved from these
    improvements will make possible a net annual saving of $9 million
    within a few years.
      An essential feature will be the abolition of the offices of all
    Presidential appointees in the Customs Service. The program cannot
    be effectively carried out without this step.
      The following offices, therefore, would be eliminated: Collectors
    of customs, comptrollers of customs, surveyors of customs, and
    appraisers of merchandise, to which appointments are now required
    to be made by the President by and with the advice and consent of
    the Senate.
      Incumbents of abolished offices will be given consideration for
    suitable employment under the civil service laws in any positions
    in customs for which they may be qualified.
      When this reorganization is completed, all officials and
    employees of the Bureau of Customs will be appointed under the
    civil service laws.
      All of the functions of the offices which will be abolished are
    presently vested in the Secretary of the Treasury by Reorganization
    Plan No. 26 of 1950 which gives the Secretary power to redelegate
    these functions.  He will exercise this power as the existing
    offices are abolished.
      The estimate of savings that will be achieved by the program of
    customs modernization and improvement, of which this reorganization
    plan is a part, is based on present enforcement levels, business
    volume, and salary scales.  Of the amounts saved, approximately $1
    million a year will be from salaries no longer paid because of the
    abolition of offices.
      The proposed new organizational framework looks to the
    establishment of new offices at both headquarters and field levels
    and abolition of present offices.
      This results in a net reduction of more than 50 separate
    principal field offices by concentration of supervisory
    responsibilities in fewer officials in charge of regional and
    district activities.  In addition to the six offices of regional
    commissioner, about 25 offices of district director will be
    established.  The regional commissioners and district directors
    will assume the overall principal supervisory responsibilities and
    functions of collectors of customs, appraisers of merchandise,
    comptrollers of customs, laboratories, and supervising customs
    agents.
      At the headquarters level, four new offices will be established
    to replace seven divisions.  A new position of special assistant to
    the Commissioner will be created and charged with responsibility
    for insuring that all Customs employees conduct themselves in
    strict compliance with all applicable laws and regulations.  Up to
    now this function has been one of a number lodged with an existing
    division.
      After investigation I have found and hereby declare that each
    reorganization included in Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1965 is
    necessary to accomplish one or more of the purposes set forth in
    section 2(a) of the Reorganization Act of 1949, as amended.
      It should be emphasized that abolition by Reorganization Plan No.
    1 of 1965 of the offices of collector of customs, comptroller of
    customs, surveyor of customs, and appraiser of merchandise will in
    no way prejudice any right of any person affected by the laws
    administered by the Bureau of Customs. The rights of importers and
    others, for example, before the Customs Court, arising out of the
    administration of such functions will remain unaffected.  In
    addition it should be emphasized that all essential services to the
    importing, exporting, and traveling public will continue to be
    performed.
      This reorganization plan will permit a needed modernization of
    the organization and procedure of the Bureau of Customs. It will
    permit a more effective administration of the customs laws.
      I urge the Congress to permit Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1965
    to become effective.                              Lyndon B. Johnson.
      The White House, March 25, 1965.